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THINK PERIPHERAL ACCESS FIRST

Your resource for optimizing vascular access for each and every patient

Peripheral Venous Access Resources
Add to your knowledge of peripheral venous access with these convenient resources.








WEBINARS

Dr. Tina Ipe shares her perspective on “Thinking Peripherally” for your patients.

Presented by Tina Ipe, MD, MPH, Houston Methodist Hospital
  • Review the different types of vascular access used in apheresis
  • Understand the benefits and risks associated with each type of vascular access
  • Learn about the experience of Houston Methodist Hospital in successful peripheral cannulation of apheresis patients

Peripheral Venous Access in Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

Presented by Amber Sanchez, MD, University of California San Diego and Tina Ipe, MD, MPH, Houston Methodist Hospital
  • Learn how thinking about peripheral vascular access first versus central venous access can address patient safety
  • Get an overview of the peripheral vascular access techniques practiced at Houston Methodist and the University of California San Diego
  • Review best practice basics for peripheral vascular access
  • Learn about introducing ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access for TPE

Peripheral Venous Access in Automated Red Blood Cell Exchange

Presented by Daniel Putensen, NP, National Health Service Blood and Transplant and Michaela Mayhew, MSc, RN, St George's University Hospital, London
  • Learn how thinking about peripheral vascular access first versus central venous access can address patient safety
  • Get an overview of the peripheral vascular access techniques practiced at University College London Hospitals and St. George's Hospital
  • Review best practice basics for peripheral vascular access
  • Learn about introducing ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access for red blood cell exchange

KEY ARTICLES


Vascular Access in Therapeutic Apheresis: Update 2013  

This review addresses the types of vascular access available for patients who need therapeutic apheresis, including peripheral vein cannulation, central venous catheters (including nontunneled and tunneled catheters), arteriovenous grafts and arteriovenous fistulas.



Long-Term Use of Antecubital Veins for Plasma Exchange  

Find out how the majority of patients who were free of serious systemic illness (other than chronic progressive multiple sclerosis) in a randomized clinical trial were able to undergo weekly plasma exchange for up to 20 weeks using superficial antecubital veins without the need to resort to more invasive methods of venous access.



Venous Access: A Practical Review for 2009  

Venous access is one of the most basic, yet critical, components of patient care. This review provides insight into the variety of options available for venous access.



Safety of Plasma Exchange Therapy in Patients With Myasthenia Gravis  

Review the results of a comparison study where data was collected from 42 patients randomized to PLEX treatment compared with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg).



Improved Care and Reduced Costs for Patients Requiring Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters: The Role of Bedside Ultrasound and a Dedicated Team  

Prospective quality assurance study to determine if a team dedicated to placing peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) would improve patient care and reduce costs.



Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Venous Access for Therapeutic Apheresis Procedures Reduces Need for Central Venous Catheters  

Physicians from the Houston Methodist Hospital performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis over a 3-month period to assess the benefit of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access. Learn about their findings here.



Is Peripheral Access for Apheresis Procedures Underutilized in Clinical Practice?—A Single Centre Experience  

Study to establish the feasibility and suitability of peripheral access for different apheresis procedures, undertaken in elective or emergency settings.






PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS



Association for Vascular Access (AVA)  
National Infusion and Vascular Access Society (NIVAS)  






REFERENCED MATERIALS

Cheung E, Baerlocher MO, Asch M, Myers A. Praxic, Venous access: a practical review for 2009. Can Fam Physician. 2009;55(5):494-496.

Ebadi H, Barth D, Bril V. Safety of plasma exchange therapy in patients with myasthenia gravis. Muscle Nerve. 2013;47(4):510-514.

Golestaneh L, Mokrzycki MH. Vascular access in therapeutic apheresis: update 2013. J Clin Apher. 2013;28(1):64-72.

Mortzell Henriksson M, Newman E, Witt V, et al. Adverse events in apheresis: an update of the WAA registry data. Transfus Apher Sci. 2016;54(1):2-15.

Noseworthy JH, Shumak KH, Vandervoort MK. Long-term use of antecubital veins for plasma exchange. Transfusion. 1989;29(7):610-613.

Putensen D, Leverett D, Patel B, Rivera J. Is peripheral access for apheresis procedures underutilized in clinical practice?—A single centre experience. J Clin Apher. 2017;32:553-559. 

Robinson MK, Mogensen KM, Grudinskas GF, Kohler S, Jacobs DO. J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2005;29(5):374-379.

Salazar E, Garcia S, Miguel R, Segura FJ, Ipe TS, Leveque C. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters. J Clin Apher. 2017;32(4):266-269.

Schonermarck U, Bosch T. Vascular access for apheresis in intensive care patients. Ther Apher Dial. 2003;7(2):215-220.

Stegmayr B, Wikdahl A. Access in therapeutic apheresis. Ther Apher Dial. 2003;7(2):209-214.

Stolz LA, Stolz U, Howe C, Farrell IJ, Adhikari S. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access: a meta-analysis and systematic review. J Vasc Access. 2015;16(4):321-326.



Using Ultrasound Guidance for Vascular Access

Using Ultrasound Guidance for Vascular Access

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