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THINK PERIPHERAL ACCESS FIRST

Your resource for optimizing vascular access for each and every patient

"Peripheral venous access is underutilized in therapeutic apheresis procedures and is the access of choice due to the relatively low rate of serious complications."1

(Golestaneh and Mokrzycki, 2013)

Peripheral or Central Vascular Access—How Do You Decide?

Patient safety is a priority; consider using peripheral access for your apheresis procedures.




DID YOU KNOW? The majority of apheresis procedures can be performed successfully with peripheral veins.2

In several studies, apheresis procedures were performed peripherally in 64.3%3 to 94.6%4 of cases.2
In some cases, peripheral access may not be feasible.5,6



Did You Know?
Red blood cell exchange and plasma exchange can be performed via single-needle or dual-needle peripheral access on Spectra Optia.
Not all options are available in all regions.
VASCULAR ACCESS IN ELECTIVE THERAPEUTIC APHERESIS2
Putensen et al (2016) reported the majority of apheresis procedures can be performed successfully with peripheral veins.



USG-PIVA = ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access.

Includes autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell harvest; mononuclear cell harvest; automated red blood cell exchange; therapeutic plasma exchange; white blood cell depletion. Elective procedures as compared to emergency procedures.


1Golestaneh L, Mokrzycki MH. Vascular access in therapeutic apheresis: update 2013. J Clin Apher. 2013;28(1):64-72.

2Putensen D, Leverett D, Patel B, Rivera J. Is peripheral access for apheresis procedures underutilized in clinical practice?—a single centre experience. J Clin Apher. 2017;32(6):553-559.

3Mortzell Henriksson M, Newman E, Witt V, et al. Adverse events in apheresis: an update of the WAA registry data. Transfus Apher Sci. 2016;54(1):2-15.

4Noseworthy JH, Shumak KH, Vandervoort MK. Long-term use of antecubital veins for plasma exchange. Transfusion. 1989;29(7):610-613.

5Stegmayr B, Wikdahl A. Access in therapeutic apheresis. Ther Apher Dial. 2003;7(2):209-214.

6Schonermarck U, Bosch T. Vascular access for apheresis in intensive care patients. Ther Apher Dial. 2003;7(2):215-220.



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