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Plasma Exchange for Specific Neurological Patients

FAST ROAD TO RESULTS FIRST-LINE THERAPY HOW IT WORKS SAFETY RESOURCES REFERENCES
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PATIENTS TREATED EARLY WITH PLASMAPHERESIS REQUIRED LESS MECHANICAL VENTILATION, AND HOSPITALISATION TIME WAS DECREASED

(Hund, 1993)

Put Patients on a Fast Road to Results With Plasma Exchange

By rapidly reducing disease mediators and suppressing the immune response, plasma exchange provides a fast road to results with a rapid clinical response for certain neurological patients. For specific patient populations, this may mean faster time off ventilator or avoiding ventilation and reducing mean time to hospital discharge.

(Cochrane Review, Chevret 2017) (Guptil, 2016)


“Improvement following plasmapheresis occurs within a few days, much faster than for other immunomodulating therapies.”  

(Saperstein 2004)




HOW DO YOU MEASURE RESULTS?





In specific instances plasma exchange was shown to decrease the time on a ventilator and the proportion of ventilator-dependent patients compared to only supportive care.

(Cochrane Review, Chevret 2017)

REDUCED TIME ON VENTILATOR

The mean ± standard deviation (SD) time on ventilator was slightly shortened in the treated group (n = 4) compared to the control group (n = 3), P = 0.50

11.7 ± 12.2 days versus 15.3 ± 6.1 days


(Cochrane Review, Chevret 2017)








Putting patients on a fast road to results may result in a reduced time to hospital discharge.

HOSPITAL DISCHARGE TIME

The mean time to hospital discharge was slightly reduced in the treated group compared to the control group.

TREATED GROUP: 48.4 ± 34.5 days
CONTROL GROUP: 53.0 ± 38.9 days


(Cochrane Review, Chevret 2017)










Safety Information

Contraindications

  • No known contraindications for the system's use, except for those associated with all automated apheresis systems
  • The infusion of certain solutions and replacement fluids may be contraindicated in some patients

Possible patient reactions

  • Anxiety, headache, light-headedness, digital and/or facial paresthesia, fever, chills, hematoma, hyperventilation, nausea and vomiting, syncope (fainting), urticaria, hypotension and allergic reactions

Reactions to transfused blood products can include1

  • Fever, circulatory overload, shock, allergic reactions, alloimmunization, graft-versus-host disease and transmission of infection

Restricted to prescription use only

  • Operators must be familiar with the system's operating instructions
  • Procedures must be performed by qualified medical personnel
  • A supervisory practitioner may supervise from a physician office or other nonhospital space that is not officially part of the hospital campus as long as he or she remains immediately available2

1AABB (ed.), et al., Circular of Information for the Use of Human Blood and Blood Components. 2006, tenth edition, Council of Europe Publishing, Seattle, WA.

2American Society for Apheresis. Guidelines for therapeutic apheresis clinical privileges. J Clin Apher. 2007;22(3):181-182.








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