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Plasma Exchange for Specific Neurological Patients

FAST ROAD TO RESULTS FIRST-LINE THERAPY HOW IT WORKS SAFETY RESOURCES REFERENCES
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Plasma exchange is recommended as first-line therapy for specific neurology patient populations as identified by guidelines from the following organizations:

American Society for Apheresis

European Federation of Neurological Societies/European Academy of Neurology (EAN)

American Academy of Neurology

Cochrane Review

CASE STUDY

Solution To Rising Costs of Treatments for Neuromuscular Diseases







Overview:

In 2008, the University of California San Diego (UCSD) introduced a plan aimed at reducing the overutilization of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) by using plasma exchange instead of IVIg in suitable cases. The collaboration among neurology, apheresis and pharmacy was essential to driving change.

Results:

The collaborative approach helped drive efforts to manage IVIg utilization and minimize costs using plasma exchange as an alternative therapy. Given current healthcare trends and financial constraints, plasma exchange could provide institutions the opportunity to reduce costs and provide an equally efficacious alternative in stated patient populations.







Safety Information

Contraindications

  • No known contraindications for the system's use, except for those associated with all automated apheresis systems
  • The infusion of certain solutions and replacement fluids may be contraindicated in some patients

Possible patient reactions

  • Anxiety, headache, light-headedness, digital and/or facial paresthesia, fever, chills, hematoma, hyperventilation, nausea and vomiting, syncope (fainting), urticaria, hypotension and allergic reactions

Reactions to transfused blood products can include1

  • Fever, circulatory overload, shock, allergic reactions, alloimmunization, graft-versus-host disease and transmission of infection

Restricted to prescription use only

  • Operators must be familiar with the system's operating instructions
  • Procedures must be performed by qualified medical personnel
  • A supervisory practitioner may supervise from a physician office or other nonhospital space that is not officially part of the hospital campus as long as he or she remains immediately available2

1AABB (ed.), et al., Circular of Information for the Use of Human Blood and Blood Components. 2006, tenth edition, Council of Europe Publishing, Seattle, WA.

2American Society for Apheresis. Guidelines for therapeutic apheresis clinical privileges. J Clin Apher. 2007;22(3):181-182.




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